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Archive | Ihofa Forest

Ary Saina

Ary Saina

What We Do

Ary Saina is a group of Malagasy conservation biologists promoting scientific research and knowledge for the conservation of Madagascar’s unique but imperiled biodiversity.

​Ary Saina was founded in 2017 with the following objectives:

  • Promote and facilitate scientific research in Madagascar
  • Contribute to the capacity building of Malagasy in science
  • Conduct scientific research to enhance biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of natural resources in Madagascar

 

Ary Saina Study Sites by Angelo Andrianiaina

How We Protect Lemurs And Other Wildlife

We lead and participate in several projects related to lemur conservation in Madagascar. Most of our members conduct research on lemur biology and ecology to help conserve lemurs in their natural sites.

The socio-economic development activities we plan to implement to improve livelihoods aim to reduce threats on lemur habitat.

What Lemur Species We Protect

Current projects are conducted in two rainforest sites: (1) in the eastern fragmented forest of Ihofa with a focus on an assemblage of different species lemurs, including the critically threatened indri (Indri indri) and black and white ruffed lemur (Varecia variegata); and (2) in the southeastern forest of Ranomafana National Park with a focus on both large-bodied diurnal lemurs like the red-bellied lemur (Eulemur rubriventer) and small-bodied nocturnal lemurs like the brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus).

 

How We Support Local Communities

Our current focus is in supporting the local communities living near Ihofa forest in Andasibe. We implement socio-economic development activities to improve their livelihoods. We are in need of funding to support the building of an elementary school in the area. We currently teach children local to our field sites (who often have no opportunity to attend school, with the closest being 8 hours walk away) skills such as writing and counting. We also deliver skills training to empower Malagasy scientists to build a career.

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