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LEEP- University of Arizona

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About the Laboratory for the Evolutionary Endocrinology of Primates (LEEP)

Adult male red-bellied lemur Atody with infant Ovy, showing off an example of allomaternal care. Photo by Pierre Lahitsara, as part of a face recognition project.

Adult male red-bellied lemur Atody with infant Ovy, showing off an example of allomaternal care. Photo by Pierre Lahitsara, as part of a face recognition project.

Our program generally focuses on primate research and conservation, with a focus on lemurs. We are concerned with how lemurs negotiate survival and reproduction in dynamic environments. The majority of our research is conducted with red-bellied lemurs (Eulemur rubriventer), but we are also involved in research with other species, such as the brown mouse lemur (Microcebus rufus), Milne-Edwards sifaka (Propithecus edwardsi), and Diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema).

Most work is conducted in Ranomafana National Park in southeastern Madagascar, but we also do work at Kianjavato and Tsinjoarivo with our collaborators.

Engaging with the local community

We engage directly with community members in several ways. We hire local experts to help us conduct our research. We train students and locals without formal education in scientific principles and date collection.

We collaborate with researchers and Centre ValBio staff on grant proposals and research. And we communicate our research at all stages through disseminating publications, giving presentations to officials, tourism guides, faculty, and students, and co-mentoring students.

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German Primate Center

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German Primate Center

About the Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit

The Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit has been operating a field station in Kirindy Forest/CNFEREF near Morondava since 1993. We are studying the behavior and ecology of 8 sympatric lemur species at Kirindy: Propithecus verreauxi, Eulemur rufifrons, Lepilemur ruficaudatus, Phaner pallescens, Cheirogaleus medius, Mirza coquereli, Microcebus murinus and Microcebus berthae.

We have been operating a field station in Kirindy Forest/CNFEREF near Morondava since 1993.

We are studying the behavior and ecology of 8 sympatric lemur species at Kirindy:

  • Propithecus verreauxi,
  • Eulemur rufifrons,
  • Lepilemur ruficaudatus,
  • Phaner pallescens,
  • Cheirogaleus medius,
  • Mirza coquereli,
  • Microcebus murinus, and
  • Microcebus berthae.
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University of Toronto

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University of Toronto

About Tropical Research in Edge Effects (TREE)

The longitudinal research objective that my students and I pursue is to integrate evolutionary ecology and conservation biogeography to model primate responses to anthropogenic disturbances. The specific aim of our research program is to determine how forest loss, forest fragmentation, and forest edges influence the lemur ecology in Madagascar.

Most of our research is in the tropical dry forests in and around Ankarafantsika National Park in north-west Madagascar, where we study:

  • Propithecus coquereli,
  • Microcebus murinus,
  • Microcebus ravelobensis,
  • Eulemur fulvus fulvus, and
  • Eulemur mongoz.
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