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How much of Madagascar’s forest have we really lost?

There has been much recent debate over the extent to which Madagascar forest cover has disappeared over time. Some estimate that around 80 to 90% of the forest cover is gone (1), while others argue that the number is actually smaller, although still significant (2). According to McConnell and Kull (2014), it is difficult to measure the net loss of forest cover due to the messy process of integrating conflicting and problematic historical data, satellite imagery, and air photos.  It’s […]

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Photo by Rachael Henning

How do Lemur Diets affect their Cognition?

What impact does diet have on lemur cognition? Why do some lemur species have more robust spatial memory than others? Although relatively little is known about cognition or memory capabilities in lemurs, there is growing evidence that the answer to the above question may actually have something to do with differences in diet between lemur species. In this blog post, we will explore this research and discuss what it means for lemurs’ cognitive ability. Spatial Memory supports retrieval of the […]

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VOYAGE D`ETUDE A SAHAMALAZA (5)

LCN Member of the Month: The Department of ADD-University of Antananarivo

Tell us more about the Department of Anthropobiology and Sustainable Development (Mention Anthropobiologie et Developpement Durable or MADD). The department of Anthropobiology and Sustainable Development or “Mention Anthropobiologie et Developpement Durable (MADD)” is one of the study programs within the Department of Paleontology and Biological Anthropology (DPBA). Professor Berthe Rakotosaminana began this department in the Faculty of Sciences at the University of Antananarivo in 1975. The Department of Paleontology and Biological Anthropology is often considered the “Birthplace of Malagasy primatologists”. […]

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University of Antananarivo

About the Mention Anthropobiologique et développement durable

The Mention Anthropobiologie et Développement Durable (ADD) houses the unique, primatology laboratory at the University of Madagascar which contains both lemuroid subfossils and holotypes of living lemurs.

ADD’s main objectives are to:

  • provide training programs about primates,
  • undertake research endeavors, and
  • promote conservation efforts.

The academics and technicians associated with this program partner with institutions at the national and international level including with non-profits, community associations, and government entities.

ADD is key to improving the abilities of Malagasy university students and helping them become leaders in the field of conservation. This is important as conservation does not just stop with protecting lemurs, but needs to encompass education, awareness raising, and helping local communities take ownership of — and actively engage with — conservation programming.

As a result of ADD, students and alumni now work in many different agencies and institutions within the country. Looking forward, ADD aims to continue working towards programming that supports and promotes the work of researchers and conservationists in Madagascar in a sustainable way.

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