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Northern Illinois University

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Northern Illinois University

About Mitchell Irwin’s Work in Behavioral Ecology, Health and Conservation of Wild Primates

My research examines the ecology and behavior of lemurs in a range of habitat types (from highly disturbed fragments to relatively intact continuous forest) in Tsinjoarivo, eastern Madagascar.

One major focus of this research is improving our understanding of lemurs’ unique adaptations (compared to other primates), which might be linked to ecological conditions in Madagascar. The second major focus is examining lemurs’ range of habitat tolerances and their ecological and behavioral responses to habitat disturbance and fragmentation.

My main focus has been on the diademed sifaka (Propithecus diadema) but other aspects of my research have focused on the lemur community and my group is expanding to focus on bamboo lemurs (Hapalemur griseus) and brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus).

Research Supported by Sadabe

My research complements and is facilitated by Sadabe, an organization working in Madagascar.

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German Primate Center

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German Primate Center

About the Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit

The Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology Unit has been operating a field station in Kirindy Forest/CNFEREF near Morondava since 1993. We are studying the behavior and ecology of 8 sympatric lemur species at Kirindy: Propithecus verreauxi, Eulemur rufifrons, Lepilemur ruficaudatus, Phaner pallescens, Cheirogaleus medius, Mirza coquereli, Microcebus murinus and Microcebus berthae.

We have been operating a field station in Kirindy Forest/CNFEREF near Morondava since 1993.

We are studying the behavior and ecology of 8 sympatric lemur species at Kirindy:

  • Propithecus verreauxi,
  • Eulemur rufifrons,
  • Lepilemur ruficaudatus,
  • Phaner pallescens,
  • Cheirogaleus medius,
  • Mirza coquereli,
  • Microcebus murinus, and
  • Microcebus berthae.
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Rice University

Rice-University

Rice University

About the Dunham Tropical Ecology and Conservation Group

We are a group of ecologists interested in tropical ecology and conservation biology. Our work focuses on evolutionary, population, and community ecology and is often applied to conservation issues in tropical rainforests including Madagascar.

We have a strong focus on understanding population and community level consequences of lemurs to anthropogenic change and understanding the role of lemurs in the ecosystem and potential consequences of their loss.

We are involved in capacity building in the field of environmental conservation in Madagascar by training Malagasy graduate and undergraduate students through advising, research training, and in-country workshops.

We have also trained several local field technicians in both primatological methods and botanical studies. Members of our group have also been involved with environmental education in the Ranomafana region.

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